Experiments with ruby-processing (processing-2.2.1) and JRubyArt for processing-3.0

Monday, 12 October 2015

Bye Bye Blogger Hello Github

It was nice to be gothic but I've moved onto github.io for blogging about JRubyArt:-

Personal JRubyArt blog



Monkstone

Ruby-Processing JRubyArt blog



JRubyArt

Wednesday, 16 September 2015

Fraction Sums

# fraction_sums.rb, by Martin Prout
attr_reader :f, :two, :three, :four, :five, :six

def setup
  sketch_title 'Math Blackboard'
  @f = createFont('Arial', 24, true)
  half = 1 / 2r     # since ruby 2.1.0 (and jruby-9.0.0.0)
  third = 1 / 3r
  quarter = 1 / 4r
  fifth = 1 / 5r
  sixth = 1 / 6r
  seventh = 1 / 7r
  format2 = '%s + %s                                     = %s'
  format3 = '%s + %s + %s                            = %s'
  format4 = '%s + %s + %s + %s                   = %s'
  format5 = '%s + %s + %s + %s + %s          = %s'
  format6 = '%s + %s + %s + %s + %s + %s = %s'
  sum2 =  half + third
  result2 = numeric_to_mixed_number(sum2)
  @two = format(format2, half, third, result2)
  sum3 =  half + third + quarter
  result3 = numeric_to_mixed_number(sum3)
  @three = format(format3, half, third, quarter, result3)
  sum4 =  half + third + quarter + fifth
  result4 = numeric_to_mixed_number(sum4)
  @four = format(format4, half, third, quarter, fifth, result4)
  sum5 =  half + third + quarter + fifth + sixth
  result5 = numeric_to_mixed_number(sum5)
  @five = format(format5, half, third, quarter, fifth, sixth, result5)
  sum6 =  half + third + quarter + fifth + sixth + seventh
  result6 = numeric_to_mixed_number(sum6)
  @six = format(format6, half, third, quarter, fifth, sixth, seventh, result6)
end

def draw
  background 10
  text_font(f, 24)
  fill(220)
  text('Math Blackboard JRubyArt', 110, 50)
  text(two, 100, 80)
  text(three, 100, 105)
  text(four, 100, 130)
  text(five, 100, 155)
  text(six, 100, 180)
end

def numeric_to_mixed_number(amount)
  amount_as_integer = amount.to_i
  if (amount_as_integer != amount.to_f) && (amount_as_integer > 0)
    fraction = amount - amount_as_integer
    format('%s %s', amount_as_integer, fraction)
  else
    amount.to_s
  end
end

def settings
  size 640, 250
  smooth 4
end

Tuesday, 15 September 2015

Bresenham's Algorithm in JRubyArt

After ruby-processing version, published by norioc on qiita
# ruby-processing sketch
# http://qiita.com/norioc/items/99514cb659aad03ab7d7
# http://aidiary.hatenablog.com/entry/20050402/1251514618
N = 15
attr_reader :rows, :cols

def setup
  sketch_title 'Bresenham`s Algorithm'
  @rows = height / N
  @cols = width / N
end

def settings
  size 400, 400
end

def build_line(from:, to:)
  next_x = from.x
  next_y = from.y
  delta_x = to.x - from.x
  delta_y = to.y - from.y
  step_x = delta_x < 0 ? -1 : 1
  step_y = delta_y < 0 ? -1 : 1
  delta_x = (delta_x * 2).abs
  delta_y = (delta_y * 2).abs
  b_line = Array.new(1, Vec2D.new(next_x, next_y))
  if delta_x > delta_y
    fraction = delta_y - delta_x / 2
    while next_x != to.x
      if fraction >= 0
        next_y += step_y
        fraction -= delta_x
      end
      next_x += step_x
      fraction += delta_y
      b_line << Vec2D.new(next_x, next_y)
    end
  else
    fraction = delta_x - delta_y / 2
    while next_y != to.y
      if fraction >= 0
        next_x += step_x
        fraction -= delta_y
      end
      next_y += step_y
      fraction += delta_x
      b_line << Vec2D.new(next_x, next_y)
    end
  end
  b_line
end

def draw
  background 255
  translate width / 2, height / 2
  rect_mode CENTER
  no_fill
  stroke 60
  (0..rows).each do |i|
    (0..cols).each do |j|
      rect((j - cols / 2) * N, (i - rows / 2) * N, N, N)
    end
  end
  x = mouse_x - width / 2 + N / 2
  y = mouse_y - height / 2 + N / 2
  b_line = build_line(from: Vec2D.new, to: Vec2D.new(x / N, y / N))
  unless b_line.empty?
    fill color('#C7B097')
    b_line.each { |v| rect(v.x * N, v.y * N, N, N) }
  end
  stroke color('#0000FF')
  stroke_width 2
  line 0, 0, mouse_x - width / 2, mouse_y - height / 2
  stroke 0
  stroke_width 1
end

Saturday, 29 August 2015

Changing window / surface dynamically in JRubyArt

Since the changes to processing-3.0 we are able to resize our sketches dynamically:-
def settings
  size(400, 400)
end

def setup
  sketch_title 'Resizable Surface'
  surface.set_resizable(true)
end

def draw
  background(255)
  stroke_weight 4
  line(100, 100, width - 100, height - 100)
end

def key_pressed
  surface.set_size(rand(200..500).floor, rand(200..500).floor)
end

In this sketch "sketch_title" actually calls surface under the hood with another 'set' method but we don't want these ugly get set prefixed methods in ruby do we. I guess I could similary "fix" resizable and convert set_size to sketch_size? And since true is given as default argument to resizable we don't need that either...
def settings
  size(400, 400)
end

def setup
  sketch_title 'Resizable Surface'
  resizable(true)
end

def draw
  background(255)
  stroke_weight 4
  line(100, 100, width - 100, height - 100)
end

def key_pressed
  sketch_size(rand(200..500).floor, rand(200..500).floor)
end
OK a bit more experimentation also works with FX2D, blows up with P2D, but that's the same with vanilla processing (threading error).

Thursday, 27 August 2015

Advanced shader sketches in JRubyArt

Andres Colubri has published some advanced shader experiments here for processing-3.0, this is one of the examples translated for JRubyArt (requires shader files from the repo. See also Andres write-up on Advanced-OpenGL. Cool sketch of a textured Earth with an independent cloud layer.
# Earth model with bump mapping, specular texture and dynamic cloud layer.
# Adapted from the THREE.js tutorial to processing by Andres Colubri,
# translated to JRubyArt by Martin Prout:
# http://learningthreejs.com/blog/2013/09/16/how-to-make-the-earth-in-webgl/

attr_reader :earth, :clouds, :earth_shader, :cloud_shader, :earth_rotation
attr_reader :clouds_rotation, :target_angle

def setup
  sketch_title 'Blue Marble'
  @earth_rotation = 0
  @clouds_rotation = 0
  earth_tex = load_image('earthmap1k.jpg')
  cloud_tex = load_image('earthcloudmap.jpg')
  alpha_tex = load_image('earthcloudmaptrans.jpg')
  bump_map = load_image('earthbump1k.jpg')
  spec_map = load_image('earthspec1k.jpg')
  @earth_shader = load_shader('EarthFrag.glsl', 'EarthVert.glsl')
  earth_shader.set('texMap', earth_tex)
  earth_shader.set('bumpMap', bump_map)
  earth_shader.set('specularMap', spec_map)
  earth_shader.set('bumpScale', 0.05)
  @cloud_shader = load_shader('CloudFrag.glsl', 'CloudVert.glsl')
  cloud_shader.set('texMap', cloud_tex)
  cloud_shader.set('alphaMap', alpha_tex)
  @earth = create_shape(SPHERE, 200)
  earth.setStroke(false)
  earth.setSpecular(color(125))
  earth.setShininess(10)
  @clouds = create_shape(SPHERE, 201)
  clouds.setStroke(false)
end

def draw
  background(0)
  translate(width / 2, height / 2)
  point_light(255, 255, 255, 300, 0, 500)
  target_angle = map1d(mouse_x, (0..width), (0..TWO_PI))
  @earth_rotation += 0.05 * (target_angle - earth_rotation)
  shader(earth_shader)
  push_matrix
  rotate_y(earth_rotation)
  shape(earth)
  pop_matrix
  shader(cloud_shader)
  push_matrix
  rotate_y(earth_rotation + clouds_rotation)
  shape(clouds)
  pop_matrix
  @clouds_rotation += 0.001
end

def settings
  size(600, 600, P3D)
end

Monday, 17 August 2015

Java-8-lambda and jruby extensions

Should we be getting excited about java-8-lambda for jruby extensions (working in NetBeans I got this suggestion when updating source from java-7 to java-8 having listened to Charlies talk at JVMLS2015 perhaps we should?
// Java seven

public static void createVec2(final Ruby runtime) {
    RubyClass vec2Cls = runtime.defineClass("Vec2D", runtime.getObject(), new ObjectAllocator() {
            @Override
            public IRubyObject allocate(Ruby runtime, RubyClass rubyClass) {
                return new Vec2(runtime, rubyClass);
            }
    });
    vec2Cls.defineAnnotatedMethods(Vec2.class);

}

// Java eight
public static void createVec2(final Ruby runtime) {
    RubyClass vec2Cls = runtime.defineClass("Vec2D", runtime.getObject(), (Ruby runtime1, RubyClass rubyClass) -> new Vec2(runtime1, rubyClass));
    vec2Cls.defineAnnotatedMethods(Vec2.class);
}
Update 22 August 2015 just released JRubyArt 0.5.0 featuring java8lambda in production...

Friday, 14 August 2015

AABB for JRubyArt using keyword args

UPDATED ENTRY 2 September 2015, to avoid clash with toxicgem AABB is now AaBb since JRubyArt-0.6.0
I'm adding a 2D axis aligned bounding box to JRubyArt, here's what it looks like, position can be conditionally updated (ie if block given, only updates if the block evaluates to true):-
# Axis aligned bounding box class (AABB would clash with Toxicgem)
class AaBb
  attr_reader :center, :extent

  def initialize(center:, extent:)
    @center = center
    @extent = extent
  end

  def self.from_min_max(min:, max:)
    new(center: (min + max) * 0.5, extent: max - min)
  end

  def position(vec)
    return @center = vec unless block_given?
    @center = vec if yield
  end

  def scale(d)
    @extent *= d
  end

  def contains?(vec)
    rad = extent * 0.5
    return false unless (center.x - rad.x..center.x + rad.x).cover? vec.x
    (center.y - rad.y..center.y + rad.y).cover? vec.y
  end
end

Here is an example using it (based on processing Basics/Input/MouseFunctions.pde but vastly superior to my thinking). Two AaBb objects are used, one to define the window bounds so we can stop block going off screen (vanilla processing example fails to do that) and one to define the block area.
# Click on the box and drag it across the screen.

attr_reader :block, :block_locked, :over_block, :renderer, :bounds
BLOCK_WIDTH = 150

def setup
  sketch_title 'AaBb Example'
  @block = Block.new(
    center: Vec2D.new(width / 2, height / 2),
    size: Vec2D.new(BLOCK_WIDTH, BLOCK_WIDTH))
  @locked = false
  @over_block = false
  @bounds = AaBb.new(
    center: Vec2D.new(width / 2, height / 2),
    extent: Vec2D.new(width - BLOCK_WIDTH, height - BLOCK_WIDTH))
  @renderer = AppRender.new(self)
end

def draw
  background 0
  fill 153
  if block.over?(Vec2D.new(mouse_x, mouse_y))
    @over_block = true
    stroke 255
    fill 255 if block_locked?
  else
    @over_block = false
    stroke 153
  end
  # Draw the box as a shape
  begin_shape
  block.points_array.each { |vec| vec.to_vertex(renderer) }
  end_shape(CLOSE)
end

def block_locked?
  block_locked
end

def over_block?
  over_block
end

def mouse_pressed
  if over_block?
    @block_locked = true
    fill 255
  else
    @block_locked = false
  end
end

def mouse_dragged
  return unless block_locked?
  position = Vec2D.new(mouse_x, mouse_y)
  block.new_position(position) { bounds.contains? position }
end

def mouse_released
  @block_locked = false
end

def settings
  size 640, 360
  smooth 4
end

# Use class to contain block behaviour
class Block
  attr_reader :aabb

  def initialize(center:, size:)
    @aabb = AaBb.new(center: center, extent: size)
  end

  def new_position(center, &block)
    @aabb.position(center.dup, &block)
  end

  def over?(vec)
    aabb.contains? vec
  end

  # use for shape
  def points_array
    a = aabb.center - aabb.extent * 0.5
    c = aabb.center + aabb.extent * 0.5
    b = Vec2D.new(c.x, a.y)
    d = Vec2D.new(a.x, c.y)
    [a, b, c, d]
  end

  # use for rect
  def points
    [aabb.center, aabb.extent]
  end
end

Thursday, 13 August 2015

Numeric#step with keyword arguments in JRubyArt (and jruby-9.0.0.0)

Since jruby-9.0.0.0 we can use many syntax features of ruby-2.1, most useful of these for JRubyArt is the ability to make code more readable/reliable with various keyword arguments changes here is one such example:-
# We extend the language of conditionals by adding the
# keyword "elsif". This allows conditionals to ask
# two or more sequential questions, each with a different
# action.

def setup
  background 0
  2.step(by: 2, to: width - 2) do |i|
    # If 'i' divides by 20 with no remainder
    # draw the first line..
    # else if 'i' divides by 10 with no remainder
    # draw second line, else draw third line
    if (i % 20) == 0
      stroke 255
      line i, 80, i, height / 2
    elsif (i % 10) == 0
      stroke 153
      line i, 20, i, 180
    else
      stroke 102
      line i, height / 2, i, height - 20
    end
  end
end

def settings
  size 640, 360
end

Thursday, 30 July 2015

Ruby-Processing now using pry for live coding mode

The latest release of ruby-processing uses pry for live coding, and this is genuinely exciting. Here is a live mode for a class wrapped jwishy.rb sketch, which I have listed in the pry console using '$' command (NB: click on images to see full size):-

This is all the class wrapping needed

class JWishy < Processing::App
  # bare sketch code
end
Bare sketches instead get listed as the super class, but to be honest listing of the code in the pry console is not that exciting see embedded video, the exciting bit is to be able to futz with sketch code from the console and watch it affect the running console (but why not try it for yourself). In the "Wishy Worm" example we change the background of the sketch by changing the @back_color variable, and change the bluish accessor method to a custom method that returns bluish as function of the y_wiggle variable

But you can do so much more, including 'ls' available methods, and remember pry has a built in help...


live from monkstone on Vimeo.

Live coding in ruby-processing now using pry

Bounce.rb code used in video
You should also checkout the pry 'edit' function, which allows you to use your favourite editor to edit a method say 'JWishy#draw'

Sunday, 26 July 2015

Yet more experiments with JRubyArt and pry

My experience of ruby-processing with pry (for live mode) has not been promising, however things change so I thought I would give it another go, since the live IRB, has not been that wonderful either:-
The live.rb code
# An pry shell for live coding.
# Will start with your sketch.

require_relative 'base'
Processing.load_and_run_sketch

ARGV.clear # So that pry doesn't try to load them as files.

require 'pry'
$app.pry

The sketch k9 create fred 300 300 --wrap
class Fred < Processing::App
  def setup
    sketch_title 'Fred'
  end

  def draw

  end

  def settings
    size 300, 300, FX2D
    # smooth # here
  end
end

k9 live fred.rb

Turns out it was a really lucky choice to experiment with FX2D sketch (as there might be threading or other issues with JAVA2D), another strategy that seemed to work well is to redefine the sketch draw loop from pry (still can't see a serious use case, but it is a bit of fun). IRB can handle a yield block in draw loop (with block_given? guard) but it doesn't play too well with pry.

Tuesday, 14 July 2015

A more refined (ruby-2.2) interface for java classes with mixed arguments

Since ruby-2.0 it has been possible to use keywords as first class arguments, and ruby-2.1 introduced the required keyword argument (these are available to JRubyArt and potentially ruby-processing since jruby-9.0.0.0). So I thought it would be sensible to make use of them to make say the parameters of an ArcBall library more descriptive:-
# experimental ArcBall class
class ArcBall
  attr_reader :applet, :x, :y, :r
  def initialize(app:, center_x: nil, center_y: nil, radius: nil)
    @applet = app
    @x = (center_x.nil?) ? app.width * 0.5 : center_x
    @y = (center_y.nil?) ? app.height * 0.5 : center_y
    @r = (radius.nil?) ? app.width * 0.8 : radius
  end

  def to_s
    format('ArcBall.new(applet: %s, centre_x: %d, centre_y: %d, radius: %d)',
           applet, x, y, r)
  end
end

Applet = Struct.new(:width, :height) do
  def to_s
    'MyApplet'
  end
end

applet = Applet.new(800, 600)
puts ArcBall.new(app: applet).to_s
puts ArcBall.new(app: applet, center_x: 300, center_y: 200, radius: 800).to_s

Output:
ArcBall.new(applet: MyApplet, centre_x: 400, centre_y: 300, radius: 640)
ArcBall.new(applet: MyApplet, centre_x: 300, centre_y: 200, radius: 800)

Testing whether concept works in practice for JRubyArt (using a local ArcBall library in sketchbook for test purposes);-
load_library :arcball

def setup
  sketch_title 'Arcball Box'
  ArcBall.new(app: self)
  fill 180
end

def draw
  background 50
  box 300, 300, 300
end

def settings
  size 600, 600, P3D
  smooth 8
end

# experimental ArcBall class
class ArcBall
  include_package 'arcball'
  attr_reader :applet, :x, :y, :r
  def initialize(app:, center_x: nil, center_y: nil, radius: nil)
    @applet = app
    @x = (center_x.nil?) ? app.width * 0.5 : center_x
    @y = (center_y.nil?) ? app.height * 0.5 : center_y
    @r = (radius.nil?) ? app.width * 0.8 : radius
    app = JarcBall.new applet.to_java, x.to_java(:float), y.to_java(:float), r.to_java(:float)
    app.set_active true
  end

  def to_s
    format('ArcBall.new(applet: %s, centre_x: %d, centre_y: %d, radius: %d)',
           applet, x, y, r)
  end
end

And indeed it does work if you supply suitable java types to the "hidden" java ArcBall class.

Friday, 3 July 2015

JRubyArt-0.3.0 vs ruby-processing-2.6.12

Previously I posted a comparison between a different version of JRubyArt and ruby-processing where both were running using processing-2.2.1 and the the same version, but they had different designs. The current JRubyArt candidate is more similar to ruby-processing, but is targetting processing-3.0 (currently 3.0a10) and jruby-9.0.0.0 (currently jruby-9.0.0.0.rc1). I see ruby-processing as sticking with processing-2.2.1, but remaining compatible with stable releases of jruby, whereas JRubyArt will only be compatible with processing-3.0a10+.

External Dependencies

  • ruby-processing requires an installed version of processing-2.2.1
  • ruby-processing requires an installed version of processing-3.0a10+

Core processing libraries (sound, video etc)

  • ruby-processing has builtin support 
  • jruby_art has the same built in support but sound, video libraries are now external (since processing-3.0)

Contributed processing libraries

  • ruby-processing has builtin support for libraries installed by processing ide 
  • jruby_art has the same builtin support for libraries installed by processing

Vec2D, Vec3D, Arcball and DEGLUT

  • ruby-processing requires load_library 
  • jruby_art these libraries automatically loaded into jruby runtime

Processing::Proxy module

  • in ruby-processing Proxy can be used to mimic processings inner classes, probably v. bad juju convenience isn't everything 
  • in jruby_art a different Proxy can also be used to mimic processings inner classes but has a simpler implementation

Thursday, 2 July 2015

Experimenting with standalone app using jruby

On the jruby wiki there is an explanation of how to create standalone JRuby apps, it appears to be v. old referring to since JRuby-1.6 but I have found it still works with JRuby-9.0.0.0-SNAPSHOT (as of 2 July 2015) see steps I took:-
cp jruby/lib/jruby.jar myapp.jar         # adjust path to jruby.jar
echo "puts 'hello'" >> jar-bootstrap.rb
jar ufe myapp.jar org.jruby.JarBootstrapMain jar-bootstrap.rb
java -jar myapp.jar

output was as expected 'hello'. Perhaps I could harness this for JRubyArt app export?
Here is what my myapp.jar MANIFEST.MF looks like:-
Manifest-Version: 1.0
Archiver-Version: Plexus Archiver
Built-By: tux
Created-By: Apache Maven 3.3.3
Build-Jdk: 1.8.0_45
Main-Class: org.jruby.JarBootstrapMain

Apparently you can also embed additional .rb files into the jar, and the root of the jar file will be used as an implicit LOAD_PATH entry. Warbler is another option to consider.

Friday, 26 June 2015

When to use Processing::Proxy

Just in case it has passed you by, processing uses java inner classes to give your own classes access to the PApplet methods/variables. For ruby-processing you can include the Processing::Proxy module to give you a similar level of access, note the width and height variables are not available (you can use $app.width and $app.height to get round that). This all very non OO so you should use it only when you need it:-

Wednesday, 17 June 2015

This Hemesh Sketch Forced me to use JRuby Edges

New improved, updated and dried since 22 September 2015

load_library :hemesh

# Module used to include java packages
module MS
  include_package 'wblut.math'
  include_package 'wblut.processing'
  include_package 'wblut.hemesh'
  include_package 'wblut.geom'
end

NUM = 50
attr_reader :mesh, :render, :points

def setup
  sketch_title 'Sponge'
  ArcBall.init(self)
  create_mesh
  @render = MS::WB_Render3D.new(self)
end

def draw
  background(255)
  directional_light(255, 255, 255, 1, 1, -1)
  directional_light(127, 127, 127, -1, -1, 1)
  stroke(0)
  render.draw_edges(mesh)
  no_stroke
  render.draw_faces(mesh)
end

def mouse_pressed
  create_mesh
end

def create_mesh
  rs = MS::WB_RandomOnSphere.new
  creator = MS::HEC_ConvexHull.new
  @points = (0..NUM).map { rs.next_point.mul_self(300.0) }
  creator.set_points(points)
  creator.setN(NUM)
  @mesh = MS::HE_Mesh.new(creator)
  @mesh = MS::HE_Mesh.new(MS::HEC_Dual.new(mesh))
  ext = MS::HEM_Extrude.new.set_chamfer(25).set_relative(false)
  mesh.modify(ext)
  sel = ext.extruded
  ext = MS::HEM_Extrude.new.set_distance(-40)
  mesh.modify_selected(ext, sel)
  mesh.smooth(2)
end

def settings
  size(800, 800, P3D)
  smooth(8)
end

Watch Mode Working in Ruby-Processing-3.0

Hey not only can I run sketches in ruby-processing-3.0 using my toxiclibs gem but I can also run them in watch mode, my only problem is can't dispose of the frame of the old sketch (has black background, which is frozen so probably not eating resources). Here I am using jEdit as my ruby-processing ide, which has advantages if you you want test different java versions etc...:-

# A ruby processing-3.0 sketch
#
#
# This example implements a custom VolumetricSpace using an implicit function
# to calculate each voxel. This is slower than the default array or HashMap
# based implementations, but also has much less memory requirements and so might
# be an interesting and more viable approach for very highres voxel spaces
# (e.g. >32 million voxels). This implementation here also demonstrates how to
# achieve an upper boundary on the iso value (in addition to the one given and
# acting as lower threshold when computing the iso surface)
#
# Usage:
# move mouse to rotate camera
# w: toggle wireframe on/off
# -/=: zoom in/out
# l: apply laplacian mesh smooth
#
#

#
# Copyright (c) 2010 Karsten Schmidt & ruby-processing version Martin Prout 2012
# This sketch relies on a custom toxiclibscore library for PovRAY export
#
# This library is free software you can redistribute it and/or
# modify it under the terms of the GNU Lesser General Public
# License as published by the Free Software Foundation either
# version 2.1 of the License, or (at your option) any later version.
#
# http://creativecommons.org/licenses/LGPL/2.1/
#
# This library is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
# but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY without even the implied warranty of
# MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the GNU
# Lesser General Public License for more details.
#
# You should have received a copy of the GNU Lesser General Public
# License along with this library if not, write to the Free Software
# Foundation, Inc., 51 Franklin St, Fifth Floor, Boston, MA  02110-1301  USA
#

require 'toxiclibs'
load_library :vecmath
RES = 64
ISO = 0.2
MAX_ISO = 0.66
attr_reader :mesh, :gfx, :curr_zoom, :is_wire_frame

def setup
  sketch_title 'Isosurface'
  ArcBall.init(self)
  @gfx = Gfx::ToxiclibsSupport.new(self)
  vol = EvaluatingVolume.new(TVec3D.new(400, 400, 400), RES, RES, RES, MAX_ISO)
  surface = Volume::HashIsoSurface.new(vol)
  @mesh = WETriangleMesh.new
  surface.compute_surface_mesh(mesh, ISO)
  @is_wire_frame = false
end

def settings
  size(720, 720, P3D)
end

def draw
  background(200, 0, 200)
  if is_wire_frame
    no_fill
    stroke(255)
  else
    fill(255)
    no_stroke
    define_lights
    lights
  end
  @gfx.mesh(mesh, true)
end

def key_pressed
  case key
  when 'w', 'W'
    @is_wire_frame = !is_wire_frame
  when 'l', 'L'
    LaplacianSmooth.new.filter(mesh, 1)
  when 's', 'S'
    save_frame('implicit.png')
  end
end

def define_lights
  ambient_light(50, 50, 50)
  point_light(30, 30, 30, 200, -150, 0)
  directional_light(0, 30, 50, 1, 0, 0)
  spot_light(30, 30, 30, 0, 40, 200, 0, -0.5, -0.5, PI / 2, 2)
end

# Creating a volumetric space class
#
class EvaluatingVolume < Volume::VolumetricSpace
  include Processing::Proxy
  attr_reader :upper_bound
  FREQ = PI * 3.8

  def initialize(scal_vec, resX, resY, resZ, upper_limit)
    super(scal_vec, resX, resY, resZ)
    @upper_bound = upper_limit
  end

  def clear
    # nothing to do here
  end

  def getVoxelAt(i)
    getVoxel(i % resX, (i % sliceRes) / resX, i / sliceRes)
  end

  def getVoxel(x, y, z)  # can't overload so we renamed
    val = 0
    if x > 0 && x < resX1 && y > 0 && y < resY1 && z > 0 && z < resZ1
      xx = x * 1.0 / resX - 0.5  # NB: careful about integer division !!!
      yy = y * 1.0 / resY - 0.5
      zz = z * 1.0 / resZ - 0.5
      val = cos(xx * FREQ) * sin(yy * FREQ) + cos(yy * FREQ) * sin(zz* FREQ) + cos(zz * FREQ) * sin(xx * FREQ)
      # val = sin(xx * FREQ) + cos(yy * FREQ) + sin(zz * FREQ)
      # val = sin(xx * FREQ) * (xx * FREQ) + sin(yy * FREQ) * (yy * FREQ) + sin(zz * FREQ) * (zz * FREQ)
      val = 0 if val > upper_bound
    end
    val
  end
end

Sunday, 14 June 2015

Full Screen Sketch in Ruby-Processing-3.0

Nice clean interface for fullscreen in processing-3.0a10, lets hope they keep it. PS: works a treat on Mint linux ie properly fullscreen no nasty menu-bar
# Description:
# This is a full-screen demo 
# Since processing-3.0a10 set in settings

class FullScreen < Processing::App
  def setup
    sketch_title 'Full Screen'
    no_stroke
  end

  def draw
    lights
    background 0
    fill 120, 160, 220
    (width/100).times do |x|
      (height/100).times do |y|
        new_x, new_y = x * 100, y * 100
        push_matrix
        translate new_x + 50, new_y + 50
        rotate_y(((mouse_x.to_f + new_x) / width) * Math::PI)
        rotate_x(((mouse_y.to_f + new_y) / height) * Math::PI)
        box 90
        pop_matrix
      end
    end
  end

  def settings
    full_screen P3D
  end
end

PS: does not need to be a class wrapped sketch any-more, we are not passing any parameters at runtime.

FX2D works better than JAVA2D on ruby-processing-3.0

Interesting pre-processing of pde sketches to move "size" from "setup" to "settings" does not seem to be implemented for FX2D sketches see sketch:-
FX2D sketch run from processing ide



















Possibly because of a Ben Fry kludge JAVA2D isn't playing well in ruby-processing-3.0 (but then I tried FX2D) and happiness ensued shame about the opengl sketches jumping around
def setup
  sketch_title 'FX2D'
end

def draw
  background 0
  fill 200, 0, 0
  ellipse width / 2, height / 2, 300, 200
end

def settings
  size 400, 300, FX2D
end


Sketch run from ruby-processing-3.0

Saturday, 6 June 2015

Prototyping glsl shader sketches in ruby-processing

Well actually there's an argument for sticking with ruby-processing since there is not much of a performance improvement to be gained by using vanilla processing. I have now included some modififications to ruby-processing that give it the "winning edge" for developing shader sketches in the since ruby-processing-2.6.11 the watch mode has been extended to monitor changes to the glsl shader code (in addition to the ruby code).
                                                        
rp5 watch edge_detect_capture.rb                                                                                                                                               

                                                        
vim data/edge.glsl                                                                                                                                               


// Original shader by Ken Slade
// https://www.shadertoy.com/view/ldsSWr

// Ported to Processing by Raphaël de Courville <twitter: @sableRaph>

#ifdef GL_ES
precision highp float;
#endif

uniform sampler2D texture; // iChannel0 in Shadertoy
uniform vec2 sketchSize; // iResolution in Shadertoy

//options are edge, colorEdge, or trueColorEdge
#define EDGE_FUNC edge


//options are KAYYALI_NESW, KAYYALI_SENW, PREWITT, ROBERTSCROSS, SCHARR, or SOBEL
#define SOBEL

// Use these parameters to fiddle with settings
#ifdef SCHARR
#define STEP 0.15
#else
#define STEP 1.0
#endif


#ifdef KAYYALI_NESW
const mat3 kayyali_NESW = mat3(-6.0, 0.0, 6.0,
                               0.0, 0.0, 0.0,
                               6.0, 0.0, -6.0);
#endif
#ifdef KAYYALI_SENW
const mat3 kayyali_SENW = mat3(6.0, 0.0, -6.0,
                               0.0, 0.0, 0.0,
                               -6.0, 0.0, 6.0);
#endif
#ifdef PREWITT
// Prewitt masks (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prewitt_operator)
const mat3 prewittKernelX = mat3(-1.0, 0.0, 1.0,
                                 -1.0, 0.0, 1.0,
                                 -1.0, 0.0, 1.0);

const mat3 prewittKernelY = mat3(1.0, 1.0, 1.0,
                                 0.0, 0.0, 0.0,
                                 -1.0, -1.0, -1.0);
#endif
#ifdef ROBERTSCROSS
// Roberts Cross masks (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roberts_cross)
const mat3 robertsCrossKernelX = mat3(1.0, 0.0, 0.0,
                                      0.0, -1.0, 0.0,
                                      0.0, 0.0, 0.0);
const mat3 robertsCrossKernelY = mat3(0.0, 1.0, 0.0,
                                      -1.0, 0.0, 0.0,
                                      0.0, 0.0, 0.0);
#endif
#ifdef SCHARR
// Scharr masks (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sobel_operator#Alternative_operators)
const mat3 scharrKernelX = mat3(3.0, 10.0, 3.0,
                                0.0, 0.0, 0.0,
                                -3.0, -10.0, -3.0);

const mat3 scharrKernelY = mat3(3.0, 0.0, -3.0,
                                10.0, 0.0, -10.0,
                                3.0, 0.0, -3.0);
#endif
#ifdef SOBEL
// Sobel masks (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sobel_operator)
const mat3 sobelKernelX = mat3(1.0, 0.0, -1.0,
                               2.0, 0.0, -2.0,
                               1.0, 0.0, -1.0);

const mat3 sobelKernelY = mat3(-1.0, -2.0, -1.0,
                               0.0, 0.0, 0.0,
                               1.0, 2.0, 1.0);
#endif

//performs a convolution on an image with the given kernel
float convolve(mat3 kernel, mat3 image) {
    float result = 0.0;
    for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
        for (int j = 0; j < 3; j++) {
            result += kernel[i][j]*image[i][j];
        }
    }
    return result;
}

//helper function for colorEdge()
float convolveComponent(mat3 kernelX, mat3 kernelY, mat3 image) {
    vec2 result;
    result.x = convolve(kernelX, image);
    result.y = convolve(kernelY, image);
    return clamp(length(result), 0.0, 255.0);
}

//returns color edges using the separated color components for the measure of intensity
//for each color component instead of using the same intensity for all three.  This results
//in false color edges when transitioning from one color to another, but true colors when
//the transition is from black to color (or color to black).
vec4 colorEdge(float stepx, float stepy, vec2 center, mat3 kernelX, mat3 kernelY) {
    //get samples around pixel
    vec4 colors[9];
    colors[0] = texture2D(texture,center + vec2(-stepx,stepy));
    colors[1] = texture2D(texture,center + vec2(0,stepy));
    colors[2] = texture2D(texture,center + vec2(stepx,stepy));
    colors[3] = texture2D(texture,center + vec2(-stepx,0));
    colors[4] = texture2D(texture,center);
    colors[5] = texture2D(texture,center + vec2(stepx,0));
    colors[6] = texture2D(texture,center + vec2(-stepx,-stepy));
    colors[7] = texture2D(texture,center + vec2(0,-stepy));
    colors[8] = texture2D(texture,center + vec2(stepx,-stepy));

    mat3 imageR, imageG, imageB, imageA;
    for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
        for (int j = 0; j < 3; j++) {
            imageR[i][j] = colors[i*3+j].r;
            imageG[i][j] = colors[i*3+j].g;
            imageB[i][j] = colors[i*3+j].b;
            imageA[i][j] = colors[i*3+j].a;
        }
    }

    vec4 color;
    color.r = convolveComponent(kernelX, kernelY, imageR);
    color.g = convolveComponent(kernelX, kernelY, imageG);
    color.b = convolveComponent(kernelX, kernelY, imageB);
    color.a = convolveComponent(kernelX, kernelY, imageA);

    return color;
}

//finds edges where fragment intensity changes from a higher value to a lower one (or
//vice versa).
vec4 edge(float stepx, float stepy, vec2 center, mat3 kernelX, mat3 kernelY){
    // get samples around pixel
    mat3 image = mat3(length(texture2D(texture,center + vec2(-stepx,stepy)).rgb),
                      length(texture2D(texture,center + vec2(0,stepy)).rgb),
                      length(texture2D(texture,center + vec2(stepx,stepy)).rgb),
                      length(texture2D(texture,center + vec2(-stepx,0)).rgb),
                      length(texture2D(texture,center).rgb),
                      length(texture2D(texture,center + vec2(stepx,0)).rgb),
                      length(texture2D(texture,center + vec2(-stepx,-stepy)).rgb),
                      length(texture2D(texture,center + vec2(0,-stepy)).rgb),
                      length(texture2D(texture,center + vec2(stepx,-stepy)).rgb));
    vec2 result;
    result.x = convolve(kernelX, image);
    result.y = convolve(kernelY, image);

    float color = clamp(length(result), 0.0, 255.0);
    return vec4(color);
}

//Colors edges using the actual color for the fragment at this location
vec4 trueColorEdge(float stepx, float stepy, vec2 center, mat3 kernelX, mat3 kernelY) {
    vec4 edgeVal = edge(stepx, stepy, center, kernelX, kernelY);
    return edgeVal * texture2D(texture,center);
}

void main( void ){
    vec2 uv = gl_FragCoord.xy / sketchSize.xy;
    vec4 color = texture2D(texture, uv.xy);
#ifdef KAYYALI_NESW
    gl_FragColor = EDGE_FUNC(STEP/sketchSize[0], STEP/sketchSize[1],
                            uv,
                            kayyali_NESW, kayyali_NESW);
#endif
#ifdef KAYYALI_SENW
    gl_FragColor = EDGE_FUNC(STEP/sketchSize[0], STEP/sketchSize[1],
                            uv,
                            kayyali_SENW, kayyali_SENW);
#endif
#ifdef PREWITT
    gl_FragColor = EDGE_FUNC(STEP/sketchSize[0], STEP/sketchSize[1],
                            uv,
                            prewittKernelX, prewittKernelY);
#endif
#ifdef ROBERTSCROSS
    gl_FragColor = EDGE_FUNC(STEP/sketchSize[0], STEP/sketchSize[1],
                            uv,
                            robertsCrossKernelX, robertsCrossKernelY);
#endif
#ifdef SOBEL
    gl_FragColor = EDGE_FUNC(STEP/sketchSize[0], STEP/sketchSize[1],
                            uv,
                            sobelKernelX, sobelKernelY);
#endif
#ifdef SCHARR
    gl_FragColor = EDGE_FUNC(STEP/sketchSize[0], STEP/sketchSize[1],
                            uv,
                            scharrKernelX, scharrKernelY);
#endif
}

Edit the above code to change say "#define EDGE_FUNCTION edge" to edgeTrueColor say... save the changes
                                                        
:w                                                                                                                                               
And the sketch reloads with new EDGE_FUNCTION brilliant....
To get you started checkout my fork of Filters4Processing (by Raphaël de Courville) and Andrés Colubri blog. See also processing tutorial. Find shaders from shadertoy (that Raphaël has shown we can translate for processing) check this link. See also glsl syntax highlighting in vim other versions available, other editors too.

Monday, 1 June 2015

More Experiments with Java Reflection in Ruby-Processing

I think I may have cracked it this time!!! Recently I have created a ruby-processing fork of Filters4Processing, whose examples include running movie sketches. Now in vanilla processing there are these convenience methods void movieEvent(Movie movie) and void captureEvent(Capture capture)that are used to read the movie/capture (presumably a frame at a time prior to draw loop). These are/were not available via ruby-processing, however I have found a way to make it work by creating a java interface (and compiling into my rpextras.jar). Then I reopen the Processing::App class to include the interface and it just works!!!

The Interface

package processing.core;

/**
 * This interface makes it easier/possible to use the reflection methods
 * void captureEvent(Capture capture); and
 * void movieEvent(Movie movie); from ruby-processing
 * @author Martin Prout
 */
public interface VideoInterface {
    void movieEvent(processing.video.Movie movie);
    void captureEvent(processing.video.Capture capture);
}

The video_event video library script

require 'rpextras'

class Processing::App
  include Java::ProcessingCore::VideoInterface
end
Now if those processing guys had only created some decent interfaces in the first place this would have been a bit easier.

Method in Use

#
# Speed. 
#
# Use the Movie.speed method to change
# the playback speed. The video_event library is
# required to use "movieEvent" java reflection method
#

load_libraries :video, :video_event
include_package 'processing.video'

attr_reader :mov

def setup
  size(640, 360)
  background(0)
  @mov = Movie.new(self, "transit.mov")
  mov.loop
end

def draw
  image(mov, 0, 0)
  new_speed = map(mouse_x, 0, width, 0.1, 2)
  mov.speed(new_speed)
  fill(255)
  text("%.2f" % new_speed << "X", 10, 30)
end

# The java reflection method  
def movieEvent(mov)
  mov.read
end

A capture example
load_library :video, :video_event
include_package 'processing.video'
attr_reader :cam, :my_shader

def setup
  size(640, 480, P2D)
  cameras = Capture.list
  @my_shader = load_shader('edge_detect.glsl')
  my_shader.set('sketchSize', width.to_f, height.to_f)
  start_capture(width, height)
end

def start_capture(w, h)
  @cam = Capture.new(self, w, h)
  cam.start
end

def draw
  image(cam, 0, 0)
  return if mouse_pressed?
  filter(my_shader)
end

# The java reflection method  
def captureEvent(cam)
  cam.read
end

Main problem is an introduction of a compile time dependency on processing video.jar, and also seems to be safer to keep camel case for reflection method, paradoxically that may improve in latest processing where the video library becomes an external library.

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I have developed JRubyArt and propane new versions of ruby-processing for JRuby-9.1.5.0 and processing-3.2.2